2017 Spring Conference Registration

Living & Working With Children: Taking Care of Yourself & Others

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  1. Register online below (nominal registration fees apply)
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    2017 Spring Conference

    Living and Working With Children:Register Now button
    Taking Care of Yourself and Others

    A one-day conference for Early Learning professionals, social workers and mental health professionals, and parents
    April 29, 2017

    Gain insight into the minds of young children and learn new strategies for working with them.

    This affordable one-day conference is for anyone who works with children and families on a day-to-day basis.

    Social work CEUs (3 credits) are provided for Social Workers and Counselors. Ohio Approved hours (3 hours) are provided for Early Learning Professionals.

    Parents interested in a better understanding of a young child’s social-emotional development will find this conference helpful and practical. Through generous support of The Huron Foundation, parents attend for free and transportation is available to/from the Stokes/Windermere Rapid Station. (Registration is still required for free admission.)

    Keynote address:

    Caring for the Caregiver: Practical Tools, Quick Tips and Tricks of the Mind-Body Trade
    Belleruth Naparstek, ACSW, BCD

    Naparstek

    Naparstek

    Naparstek is a clinical social worker, guided imagery pioneer, author and teacher, who maintained a psychotherapy practice for over 30 years.  In 1991, she founded Health Journeys, a leading producer and distributor of audio materials that deliver direct healing and wellness experiences at the screen and on listening devices. She also serves on the faculty of the University of Arizona’s Center for Integrative Medicine Physician Fellows Program.

    Her guided imagery has been found effective in over 20 clinical trials, and is in use at Johns Hopkins, Mayo, UHHS Cleveland, Dana Farber, the NIH, Duke University, Kaiser Permanente, UCSF Medical Center, the U.S. Army and the Veterans Administration.

    Staying Well with Guided Imagery is a widely used primer on guided imagery and healing. Her most recent book on imagery and post-traumatic stress, Invisible Heroes, won the Spirituality & Health Top 50 Books Award and has been called “the most useful book for trauma survivors to be published in the last decade”.


    Conference Details:Register Now button

    When:

    8 am to 3:30 p.m.
    Saturday, April 29, 2017

    Where:

    Hanna Perkins Center for Child Development
    19910 Malvern Road, Shaker Heights, OH 44122

    Cost:

    $45 through April 14   |   $50 after April 14   |   $55 at the door
    Free for parents (no CEUs)

    • Registration fee includes cost of professional CEUs / Ohio Approved Hours.
    • CEUs / Ohio Approved Hours are not available with free registration.
    • Parents should not plan to bring children to this conference.  

    Program Schedule

    Morning

    • 8 a.m. – Breakfast and Registration
    • 9 a.m. – Opening Remarks – Karen Baer, CEO
    • 9:15 a.m. – Keynote Address – Belleruth Naparstek, BCD
    • 10:15 a.m. – Break – Chair Massage and Yoga Self-Care Centers
    • 10:30 a.m.-Noon – Concurrent Sessions

    Parent track
    My Mad Feelings: Early guidance to prevent bullying
    Presenter: Victoria Todd, LISW-S, Child and Adolescent Psychoanalyst

    Educator track 
    Parents as Partners: The importance of family engagement
    Presenter: Carol Paull, MA, MSSA, LISW
    1.5 Ohio Approved Hours

    Mental Health Professional track 
    Feeling Blue? Addressing Postpartum Depression and other related disorders
    Presenters: Kimberly Bell, Ph.D.; and Anita Eddie, MA, ATR, MSSA, LISW-S
    1.5 Clock Hours, CSWMFTB

    Afternoon

    • Noon–1: 30 p.m. – Working Lunch (meal is included): Healthy Eating on a Budget
      Presenter: Susan Meisel, MS RD LD CDE
      Chair Massage and Yoga Self-Care Centers
    • 1:30-3 p.m. – Concurrent Sessions:    

    Parent track
    Panel Discussion: Parents Have the Best Intentions: The great impact of respect when relating to young children
    Moderator: Victoria Todd. Panelists: Ruth Hall, Carol Paull, Judy Pitlick

    Educator track 
    My Mad Feelings – Early childhood intervention to prevent bullying
    Presenters: Kenna Mycek, MSW; and Rique Sollisch
    1.5 Ohio Approved Hours

    Mental Health Professional track 
    Children and Trauma: Identifying symptoms and the need for intervention
    Presenters: Kimberly Bell, Ph.D.; and Anita Eddie, MA, ATR, MSSA, LISW-S
    1.5 Clock Hours, CSWMFTB


    CEU Information

    • Participants must attend the entire day to receive CEUs.
    • Educators will receive 3 Ohio Approved Hours.
    • Licensed social workers and counselors will receive 3 social work CEUs through CSWMFTB.
    • Free registration does not include CEUs/Ohio Approved Hours, and is limited to general sessions and “Parent Track” concurrent sessions.

    More information: Pam Millar, Community Engagement
    pmillar@hannaperkins.org    |    216-991-4472

    The-Huron-Foundation-Logo-Long

    Support Generously Provided by The Huron Foundation

    Register Now button

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      Reception celebrates appointment of HPC’s Kimberly Bell to CWRU med school post

      Press Release
      FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

      For more information:
      Bob Rosenbaum, communications
      brosenbaum@hannaperkins.org
      216-401-9342

      Reception celebrates appointment of HPC’s Kimberly Bell to CWRU med school post

      Mon., Jan. 23, 2017

      Kimberly Bell, Ph.D. Hadden Clinic at Hanna Perkins Center

      Kimberly Bell, Ph.D.
      Hadden Clinic at Hanna Perkins Center

      SHAKER HEIGHTS – Kimberly Bell, Ph.D., Clinical Director at Hanna Perkins Center for Child Development, will be honored at a reception on Jan. 26 2017, in celebration of her appointment as the John A. Hadden Jr. M.D. Professor of Psychoanalytic Child Development.

      The reception is hosted by Pamela B. Davis, M.D., Ph.D., Dean of the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, at 4:30 p.m. in the Iris S. and Bert L. Wolstein Research Building.

      The professorship is part of Bell’s role at Hanna Perkins, where she is clinical director of the Hadden Clinic. Bell took on both rolls in late 2015.

      At the medical school, her role includes development of offerings that enhance the understanding and use of psychoanalytic approaches to child development when providing medical care for young patients. Her current activities include teaching a course in Behavioral Medicine, and developing new observational pediatric rotations for students in the Physician Assistant program. These rotations are also offered to residents in the specialties of pediatrics and psychiatry.

      The Hadden Clinic at Hanna Perkins provides mental health services to children and adolescents to age 18, as well as to women suffering from postpartum depression and other related disorders.

      About Hanna Perkins

      Since 1951, The Hanna Perkins Center for Child Development has partnered with parents and professionals to help children understand, communicate and manage their feelings for success in school and life. Located in the historic renovation of the former Malvern School in Shaker Heights, Hanna Perkins provides these services:

      Hanna Perkins School: Preschool, kindergarten, parent/toddler group and an Autism Spectrum Disorders dedicated classroom, all focused on the ability to understand and manage feelings as the foundation of other essential life skills.

      Hadden Clinic, providing developmental guidance and therapy for children and adolescents, and treatment of postpartum mood and anxiety disorders in mothers.

      Continuing education and training to teachers, child care providers, social workers and other child-care specialists across Northeast Ohio.

      The Reinberger Parent Child Resource Center, offering consultation and support for parents, and other educational opportunities based on the Hanna Perkins approach to child development.

      Child and Adolescent Psychoanalytic Training, through an intensive program that prepares professionals to provide psychoanalytic therapy to children and adolescents, and to work closely with children’s parents.

      ###

       

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        A parenting technique that really works

        At a gathering of parents sponsored by The Hanna Perkins Center for Child Development (HPC), Licensed Independent Social Worker and HPC Child Psychoanalyst and Therapist Deborah Paris addressed a range of questions and concerns, including this one:

         Q: I keep hearing about “attachment parenting” and other parenting techniques. Is there a particular technique that you like?

        A:  My preferred technique is whatever works best in promoting healthy development. It begins with understanding there are certain goals in raising young children:

        • Self care
        • Self regulation
        • Self determination

        What makes people healthy is developing this sense of self – not us as parents doing for them.

        You know, we do a funny thing these days. On one hand we see the helicopter parent, who is over-involved in everything the child tries to do. On the other hand we sometimes act like children are little adults, and we expect all sorts of things from them that they aren’t ready to handle – like sitting quietly through a long meal at an upscale restaurant.

        In both extremes, what’s happening is the parents are trying to control the outcome. It’s as if by just doing or demanding all the right things, everything will come out fine. This is actually leaving the child – as an individual person – out of the equation.

        If you insist on controlling the outcome, then your child is going to struggle to learn and practice self care, self determination, self regulation. It will be about you instead of about them.

        But if you start from the perspective of what the child needs and what is going on inside of him or her– as opposed to adopting a specific parenting “technique” – you’ll end up in the right place.

        Children have an inner world that is understood (or misunderstood) from the perspective of a 2- or 3- or 4-year-old brain. Be sensitive to this. Work with them to identify and resolve misunderstandings and misconceptions. Help them learn those things the developing self requires.

        If you want to call this a parenting technique, I’d say it has a pretty good record of success.

        Image of little boy courtesy of Julie Moore/Stock.xchng

         

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          Autism Spectrum Disorders Dedicated Classroom

          Hanna Perkins’ EPIC Classroom is for children ages 4-6 with Autism Spectrum Disorders. It’s a natural extension of our school’s focus on healthy emotional development by working with children to identify, understand, manage and communicate feelings.

          EPIC – short for Exploring Potentials in Children – was developed in response to parents who have sought out the Hanna Perkins’ approach and an opportunity for close parental involvement, but also needed a classroom and educational approach tailored to the particular needs of children on the spectrum.

          Our program is designed for high functioning children who are likely to eventually transition to a mainstream environment. But it provides less stimulation and more visual learning than other preschool classrooms, to support children in the early group interaction and socialization that can be a barrier for young learners in this category.

          ClevelandClinicCforAutismHanna Perkins School is an autism scholarship provider through the Ohio Department of Education.

          The Dedicated ASD Classroom involves collaboration with the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Center for Autism.


          boy with scissorsA child’s behaviors are expressions of feelings that need to be understood, respected and responded to in the most helpful way possible. This applies to all children regardless of limitations or differences in the way they communicate.

          Often children on the spectrum show their feelings in dramatic ways that are confusing to those who don’t understand their language. In all Hanna Perkins programs, our specialists work closely with parents and teachers to help facilitate better understanding, and to support a child’s gradual ability to know, manage, and appropriately express his or her  feelings.  A child who gains this mastery over time will feel happier and more successful because of it.


          Details

          • Maximum class size of 6 children, ages 4-6
          • Five days/week, September through June
          • Monday-Thursday – 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Friday – 9 a.m.-noon
          • Staffed with two teachers experienced in working with the ASD population
          • An Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) consultant providing up-front training and ongoing consultation
          • Two Hanna Perkins-trained child therapists available to meet weekly with parents and teachers
          • An environment designed to be less stimulating than a traditional preschool classroom
          • Increased emphasis on visual learning
          • Consultation and on-site services, as needed, of a Speech & Language Therapist
          • Classroom materials and techniques designed for the ASD population

          Hanna Perkins is an Ohio Autism Scholarship Provider. For discussion about the suitability of the program for specific children, we’re happy to talk with you directly, and are glad to introduce you to our current Preschool, Kindergarten, and Parent/Toddler programs as well. Please click here to contact our Educational Director.


          Learn more:

           

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            New mom? Don’t feel right?

            mother-and-baby-1453666-1279x856_douglas john_freeimagesNew mom? Don’t feel right?

            Postpartum depression is one of several mood and anxiety disorders that can follow the birth of a child. The Hadden Clinic at Hanna Perkins offers effective treatment for these serious health issues. If you don’t feel right, call. We’ll see you within 48 hours.

            For an appointment/consultation, contact Kimberly Bell at 216.991.4472 (ext. 209 after hours).

            Not sure? Learn more about the symptoms with this short article.

            Image courtesty of Douglas John/Freeimages.com

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              Support us when you shop at Amazon: Click for details

              Support us when you shop on Black Friday and Cyber Monday. #StartWithaSmile at smile.amazon.com/ch/34-1269765 and Amazon donates to Hanna Perkins School.

              amazon-smiles_120816

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                Windows Into Children’s Behavior

                Holding page for info on Windows brochure series

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                  Hadden Clinic empaneled by CareSource as Medicaid provider

                  Press Release
                  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

                  Click to download a PDF of this release

                  For more information:
                  Karen Baer, CEO
                  kbaer@hannaperkins.org
                  216-991-4472

                  Hanna Perkins Center mental health clinic
                  now accepting  Medicaid reimbursement through CareSource

                  Friday, Nov. 18, 2016

                  SHAKER HEIGHTS – The Hadden Clinic at Hanna Perkins Center for Child Development is now accepting Medicaid reimbursement for treatment of qualified families who have coverage through CareSource.

                  The clinic provides psychotherapy and other mental health services to children and adolescents to age 18. It also specializes in treatment of Postpartum Mood and Anxiety Disorders for mothers.

                  CareSource, based in Dayton, is a leading Medicaid managed-care plan serving Northeast Ohio.

                  Being in-network with CareSource allows the Hadden Clinic to fill an important service gap in mental health care for under-represented populations, according to Clinical Director Kimberly Bell, Ph.D.

                  “We’ve always served disadvantaged populations by making use of sliding-scale fees, and we’ll continue to do so,” Bell said. “But this increases our capacity significantly to provide intensive psychotherapy to an underserved population that needs it the most.”

                  Hadden Clinic also accepts Medical Mutual of Ohio, Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield, UnitedHealthcare and Aetna.

                  The Hadden Clinic is easily accessible via public transportation. Located within the Hanna Perkins Center for Child Development, it’s one block off the Shaker Rapid (RTA Green Line) at the Courtland Station.

                  About Hanna Perkins

                  Since 1951, The Hanna Perkins Center for Child Development has partnered with parents and professionals to help children understand, communicate and manage their feelings for success in school and life. Located in the historic renovation of the former Malvern School in Shaker Heights, Hanna Perkins provides these services:

                  Hanna Perkins School: Preschool, kindergarten, parent/toddler group and an Autism Spectrum Disorders dedicated classroom, all focused on the ability to understand and manage feelings as the foundation of other essential life skills.

                  Hadden Clinic for Children & Families, providing developmental guidance and therapy for children and adolescents, and treatment of postpartum mood and anxiety disorders in mothers.

                  Continuing education and training to teachers, child care providers, social workers and other child-care specialists across Northeast Ohio.

                  The Reinberger Parent Child Resource Center, offering consultation and support for parents, and other educational opportunities based on the Hanna Perkins approach to child development.

                  Child and Adolescent Psychoanalytic Training, through an intensive program that prepares professionals to provide psychoanalytic therapy to children and adolescents, and to work closely with children’s parents.

                  ###

                   

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                    Cross-cultural test of anti-bullying program

                    trinidad-w-bell-0716While team members at The Hanna Perkins Center for Child Development were preparing this summer for the first broad-based rollout of “My Mad Feelings,” a bullying prevention curriculum for children as young as 4, Clinical Director Kimberly Bell was giving the program a cross-cultural test at a school in Trinidad and Tobago. While the test was informal, the results, she said, were strongly positive.

                    While most anti-bullying programs focus on adolescent children, the origins of bullying can be recognized at a much younger age – when children first go to school or child care, and are learning to advocate for themselves in a social setting.

                    When angry, scared or otherwise bothered, young children “share” the way they feel by grabbing, hitting or saying hurtful things –acting out the feeling so others feel it too.

                    This is normal behavior, and it signals a developmental readiness to begin learning how to express themselves verbally instead. Otherwise, their behavior makes others angry and invites disciplinary action, creating a downward spiral in self-esteem. By adolescence, these behaviors may become habitual, and are recognized as bullying. (Learn more about My Mad Feelings here.)

                    “My Mad Feelings” is classroom curriculum for children age 4-7 to support the emotional learning process. It’s being taught in all preschool classes in the Shaker Heights City School District for the 2016-17 school year – the first time the program is being used across an entire public school system.

                    But as that effort was being prepared, Bell put it to use in July with a class of 5-year-olds at the Naomi Chin Kit Memorial School in Pt. Fortin, on the island of Trinidad. Bell was invited as part of a free dental clinic by volunteers from the dentistry programs and social work programs at Buffalo State College and the University of Buffalo.

                    Conditions for the cross-cultural test were less than optimal. While the program is designed to be taught in 12 lessons, Bell had only four. So she worked in advance with Victoria Todd, author of the curriculum, to select which sections to teach.

                    It’s also intended for small-group discussion, not a full classroom.

                    Bell observed the class before beginning the program, and said typical behaviors included impulsiveness, difficulty managing big feelings, and finding words to express feelings. She also noted a general confusion between the emotions of anger and fear.

                    “Their culture contains a drive to obtain limited resources, so concepts like waiting in line and taking turns don’t come naturally there,” Bell added. She described “a mad rush and a lot of crying” when crayons were placed on the table for coloring. One boy, unhappy with his picture, cried inconsolably because he didn’t think there would be any extra paper so he could start over.

                    “Even in the toughest possible conditions, these children responded like they were hungry for it,” she said. “After the last day, when we said our goodbyes, I’ll be darned if the two children with the biggest behavior problems weren’t sharing equipment on the playground, pushing each other on the swing. They were actively identifying feelings and seeking help in problem-solving.

                    “In the end, it was very clear the basic tenets of what we do at Hanna Perkins are universal,” Bell continued. “You get a tremendous response from young children when their feelings are acknowledged and when you help them give voice to those feelings.”

                    “The teachers were hesitant at first to believe a non-authoritarian approach was going to work. But the little 4-year-old who spent the first two days crying, screaming and running away came in on Day 3, put his backpack down and prepared for class. That’s when the teachers came to me and asked for a copy of the “Mad Feelings” teaching materials, so they could continue the process.”

                    Since the experience, the school director has traveled to Cleveland to observe operations at Hanna Perkins School. She is working to raise funds for teachers to travel here to receive formal training on the “Mad Feelings” curriculum.

                    Following is a video about the experience. Brief discussion of Bell’s work with My Mad Feelings begins at 7:10.

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